Policy Solutions

NAFO policy priorities enable sustainably-managed forests to provide a variety of public benefits including building and other consumer products, renewable energy, wildlife habitat, clean air and water, and recreation. NAFO priorities include:

Urging Congress to recognize the full carbon benefits of forest bioenergy in federal policy.

  • The carbon benefits of renewable forest biomass are well established.
  • Congress should remove uncertainty and ensure the carbon benefits of renewable forest biomass.
  • A federal policy should be simple to implement.
  • Key elements of a simple approach to regulating biomass include:
    • Recognition that biomass energy will not increase carbon in the atmosphere so long as overall forest carbon is stable or increasing.
    • Use of U.S. Forest Inventory Analysis data and established science rather than complex modeling and assumptions.
    • Implementation on the broadest possible national scale.
    • Recognition that forest products manufacturing residuals, harvest residuals and thinnings do not increase and can even reduce overall carbon in the atmosphere.

Retaining the current tax treatment of timber to preserve the economic viability and public benefits of private forest ownership.

  • The timber tax provisions recognize the treatment of private forests as a long-term investment in real property and address in a practical way the costs and risks of maintaining healthy forests.
  • The timber tax provisions help working forest owners create jobs, provide environmental benefits and help Americans reach financial goals.
  • Repeal of the timber tax provisions would adversely impact jobs, the economy, and public benefits.

Other policies to help keep working forests working.

  • Providing Benefits to Clean Water.
  • Promoting Conservation
  • Ensuring Strong Markets for Wood.
Green Building Wood is the ultimate green building material. When used for building, it stores carbon, helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 2011...
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Forests are under pressure from ever-increasing threats such as wildfire, invasive pests and pathogens, and development. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Bill conservation programs engage landowners through outreach, education...
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Waters of the U.S. See Restoring Existing Regulation of Waters of the U.S. Pesticide Permits Forest management is a long-term land use with infrequent fertilizer and chemical use. The use...
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Private Forest Lands: Jobs, the Environment and the Role of the U.S. Tax Code Private working forests are natural resources that provide our society with important economic, environmental, and public...
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Forest bioenergy utilization is essential to implement policies that increase the use of reliable sources of domestic renewable energy. Forest bioenergy is the primary base-load source of renewable energy in...
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Strong markets for forests products enable us to grow more forests The biggest threat to deforestation in the U.S. is the conversion of working forests to more economic, non-forest uses. ...
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Working forests are fundamental to reducing overall greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations in the atmosphere. Trees absorb carbon dioxide from the air through photosynthesis and store it in the roots, stem,...
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Following the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Massachusetts v Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the EPA began regulating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from automobiles under the Clean Air Act (CAA)....
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NAFO policy priorities enable sustainably-managed forests to provide a variety of public benefits including building and other consumer products, renewable energy, wildlife habitat, clean air and water, and recreation. NAFO...
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